restoration

12 November 2012






Remember this?  Well remember away, 'cause that baby is yesterday's news.

So, how do you restore an Eames shell?  Easy.  First you read (and re-read) the ins and outs of restoring an Eames shell on Chairfag, and for the sake of completeness head over to see how Plastolux tackled a similar job  All good, except we were dealing with something a little different - a shell which, in a previous life, had been upholstered with naugahyde or fabric ... whichever, whatever.  What next?  Thankfully we were au fait with the goings on at Manhattan Nest, and it just so happened that Daniel had already undertaken a comparable restoration with quite spectacular results.  

We didn't deviate that much from the tried-and-tested way of doing things, but here's a few out-of-the-ordinaries we came up against:

Foam remnants:  This was fairly dried out.  Not flaky dry you understand - no, that would have been too easy.  To remove this, our tool of choice was a bog standard kitchen knife.  Using the tip of the non-serrated edge at just the right angle we scraped back and forth, back and forth, back and forth, back and forth ... like, forever.



Adhesive:  We managed to get rid of all but the most stubborn smears of adhesive using a fine sanding sponge lightly soaked in water.  Daniel at Manhattan Nest had left us a helpful comment regarding a product he'd heard great things about called 'SOY-IT' to strip the adhesive off.  Upon further investigation, it turns out that here in the UK you can only buy vat loads of this stuff at a time. Great.  What next?  Oh yeah, that trusty workshop staple - nail polish remover.  Ah-huh.  Yeap.  It worked.



Discolouration:  We now had the beginnings of a great looking shell, but there was discolouration in the fibreglass between the area we'd worked on compared to the fibreglass which had been foam/adhesive free for some time.  Not to worry ... electric sander time.



Penetrol:  Except Penetrol over here is called Owatrol, and Owatrol sell about ten thousand different products ... it's this Owatrol Oil you'll need.

We covered the shocks in a previous post and found ourselves a H-base courtesy of that well-known auction website ... everything fitted nicely, thank you very much.  It ain't perfect - it has three holes in the seat and the shock mount adhesive has bleed through the fibreglass.  Do we care?  No, no we don't.

8 comments:

  1. No way that is the same chair! That's come up a dream.

    Who knew nail polish remover and a butter knife could be a modernist's best friend? xx

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    1. Haha ... you made us laugh out loud with that comment!

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  2. The transformation is amazing. You did a fantastic job.

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    1. We're pretty pleased with the result. Thanks Dana.

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  3. Looks so great!! Good call on the nail polish remover, too! She's beautiful!

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    1. Thanks! Have since heard that leaving them out in the rain can help aid foam/adhesive removal ... will have to give that a try next time!

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  4. What an awesome transformation!

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  5. kiddie chair
    -:we are happy to read your post , its a very nice and more informative...

    ReplyDelete

 

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